Which civil service exam books will be Beneficial for you?

Which civil service exam books will be Beneficial for you?

We all know that getting into civil service examinations is not the easy work. In fact, the most brilliant and smart students who are dedicated towards studies and the spirit to do work for the nation have the tendency to clear the UPSC Examinations. UPSC exam held every year and lakhs of students gives the UPSC examinations every year but only thousands of students get qualified the complete UPSC examinations and secured some position in the Bureaucracy. The most important thing which Aspirants who qualifies the UPSC exam and the Aspirants who was not able to into UPSC is the only difference is the selection of civil service exam books. People and UPSC Aspirants are very busy and always confuse about the books for IAS Examinations.

 

Books for Prelims Mains and Interview of IAS Examinations

 

UPSC Examinations consist of three successive stages which are mainly termed preliminary examinations, Mains Examinations and Personality test which is also termed as Interview. All the materials for each exam are different and also the cost of the study materials are very high as compared to the other stuff. When you are planning to give the UPSC IAS IPS Examinations, You should always choose the Best Books for Civil service examinations, which is the very important turning point in your preparations.

 

All you need is the quality study material and the Quality timetable with proper Consistency. IF you want to be part of UPSC Examinations, You have to give your day and night to study and learn. Books play a major role in the UPSC CSE but the most important thing is also about the proper learning plan. Civil service exam books can be purchased from various sources of online and offline stores which play the major role in CSE and if you purchase books from online stores like www.bestbooksforias.com , You will also get discount up to 60 % of books.

 

 

Iran Boosts Ties With Italy And France – June 2016 Current Affairs

Iran Boosts Ties With Italy And France

 

 

Iranian President Mr. Hassan Rouhani visited Italy and France from January 26 to 30, 2016 on his first official visits to both countries. Iran is emerging from the shadows after 12 years of international trade sanctions. It is 16 years since an Iranian president last made a state visit to Europe, and asIran returned to the international stage after more than a decade of sanctions, there was huge anticipation both at home and abroad about the potential changes to come. Mr. Rouhani met Pope Francis in the Vatican and talked about problems afflicting the Middle East.

Mr. Rouhani also met the Italian Prime Minister, Mr. Matteo Renzi. During Mr. Rouhani’s visit, Italy and Iran signed 17 billion euros worth of business deals. The Italian deals cover areas including energy, infrastructure, steel, shipbuilding and aviation. There was a 3.7-billion euro contract for oil services group Saipem, up to 5.7 billion euros in contracts for steel firm Danieli, up to 4 billion euros of business for infrastructure firm Condotte d’Acqua, 4 billion euros for rail and road company Gavio and 400 million euros for planes from Finmeccanica. Europe was Iran’s largest trading partner before the sanctions and Italy were second only after Germany, with seven billion euros in trade, falling to 1.5 billion euros after the sanctions. Italy hopes to rebuild that to three billion in exports alone by 2018. Mr. Rouhani talked up his country as a regional trade hub and pillar of stability saying that generating economic growth and jobs in the Middle East were crucial to defeating extremism.

Iranian President Mr. Rouhani reached France on January 28, 2016, starting with investments to boost Iran’s flagging economy that had been crippled by decades of sanctions. French President Mr. Francois Hollande said in a joint news conference following a meeting with Mr. Rouhani at the Elysee Palace that he wanted the relationship to be useful to both countries and useful to the Middle East region affected by wars, crises, and tragedies. Mr. Hollande added that he raised the issue of human rights and freedom during the meeting. Mr. Rouhani said during the joint conference that they must help the Syrian people so that they could build a sustainable future for the country.

A total of 20 agreements were signed after Mr.’ Rouhani’s meeting with Mr. Hollande. Iran Air signed a deal to buy .118 aircraft from Airbus, valued at 22.8 billion euros ($25 billion). Iran Air and Airbus signed an agreement for the acquisition of the full range of new Airbus airliners (73 wide-bodied and 45 single aisles). This includes pilot and maintenance training and support services to help the entry into service and efficient operations of these new aircraft. A comprehensive co-operation agreement to modernize the civil aviation sector of Iran was linked. The agreement was signed to support the development of Air Navigation Services, airport, and aircraft operations,

regulatory harmonization, technical and academic training, maintenance, repair and industrial cooperation. PSA Peugeot Citroen also announced a joint venture with Iran Khodro to produce latest- generation vehicles in Tehran by the end of 2017. French and Iranian companies also signed agreements in the sectors of health and agriculture. Oil and gas company Total inked a deal with the National Iranian Oil Company to purchase crude oil.
Mr. Rouhani had originally been due to visit Europe in November 2015 but canceled2 the trip after an Islamic State attack on Paris, which killed 130 people. Many Western nations have accused Iran of funding various militant groups, and despite a landmark nuclear deal between the world powers and Tehran in 2015, the United States is keeping some of its financial sanctions in place because of the alleged links and human rights abuses.

WHEN FAIR IS NOTSO LOVELY

 

 

Still, some things may be chang¬ing. In the absence of social reform movements, some politicians have realised that they can leverage a pow¬erful media to take on the dinosaurs. So when Kanimozhi and Irani stood up to challenge Sharad Yadav’s state-ments, friends and colleagues cutting across party lines—Satish Chandra Mishra of the BSP, Derek O’Brien of the Trinamool Congress, Vandana Chavan of the NCP, the Left MPs, Kumari Selja of the Congress, among others—infor-mally consulted with each other as to how to make it known that these com¬ments were unacceptable.

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Sharad Yadav, who has remained an MP for several years despite his opposition to the entry of “par kati mahilayein” (literally, women whose wings have been clipped, or those with short hair and therefore, modem) dur¬ing an earlier debate on the women’s reservation bill, was forced to apolo¬gise in Parliament for his comments on Irani the next day. Giriraj Singh, it is said, was ordered to say sorry by none other than BJP President Amit Shah.

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Kanimozhi and several other like- minded parliamentarians say they hope to generate consensus on social issues, cutting across party lines, in the Lok Sabha. Certainly, an aware¬ness that the colour of your skin cannot be confused with the content of your character—alongside a rereading of Martin Luther King Jr—must be on top of that list.

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with fair skin which cuts across politi-cal lines—which Giriraj Singh so eloquently described as “gori cham- df—finds its echo on the Bollywood end of the spectrum, with almost all the Hindi film industry’s top actors determinedly promot¬ing skin-whitening creams (see box).

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Save for Amitabh Bach- chan, and Aamir Khan, who refuses to stoop so low, sever¬al of the Hindi film industry’s top actors clearly believe in the “no big deal” school.
Shah Rukh Khan or Shahid Kapoor, Priyanka Chopra or Preity Zinta, Juhi Chawla or John Abraham, as well as the invincible Virat Kohli-Anushka Sharma duo, all the top cats of Bollywood so relentlessly promote a “fairer skin” syndrome that Frank Harris III, an African-American, wrote in the Connecticut paper

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Hartford Couranfs November 14,2014 edition that Indian advertising reminded him of the time “long ago, (when) my grandfather in Mississippi, whose skin was black, would send my dad to the store to buy skin-lightening cream”. Harris needs visit India today to not only witness the barely concealed racism that Indians display towards Africans but also the distaste that many of the Brahminical elite, especially from north India, still demonstrate towards anybody who don’t look or behave like them.

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Certainly, the matrimonial ads in contemporary Indian newspapers offering “slim brides with wheatish” complexion are a dead giveaway. Charu Gupta, a historian at Delhi University who works on gender and sexuality, points out that although the Hindu gods are dark-skinned, “the association of the colour white with power dur¬ing 250 years of colonial rule became so ingrained that the black body was coded in particular ways… helpless, staring, poverty-stricken.”
“On the other hand, white skin was analogous with ideas of purity, prog¬ress and property,” Gupta adds.

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THE ODD COUPLE

THE ODD COUPLE

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Mehbooba Mufti says the PDP-BJP alliance is aware of the basic differences between the two parties but is confident it can mainstream Kashmiris and empower Jammu

 

 

We are here to do things for the people of Jammu and Kashmir. If we cannot deliver, we might as well pack our bags and sit at home.” Fifty- five-year-old Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) chief Mehbooba Mufti is clearly unwilling to back down.
Viewed widely as the behind-the- scenes face that actually calls the shots in her father, Chief Minister Mufti Mohammad Sayeed’s coalition with the BJP in Jammu and Kashmir, the daughter is intent on pushing the envelope on what she is convinced will benefit not just her constituents in the Kashmir valley but, equally, the long ‘out of power’ people of Jammu and Ladakh.

“At this point there is a prime minister who has more authority at the Centre and will be able to deliver much more.”
There’s been a nationwide furore instigated by Sayeed first acknowled-ging the role of Pakistan and the militants in “permitting” peaceful assembly elections in Jammu and Kashmir, and the more recent contro-versial release of Hurriyat separatist Masarat Alam on March 7, and the consequent panic in the BJP rank and file, all the way from Prime Minister Narendra Modi to ordinary saffron workers in Jammu, Kishtwar, Doda and Baderwah.

Mufti says she has “no regrets”, insisting that all her father did was to
impose the writ of the Supreme Court in the instance of Alam. “Tell us that the Supreme Court does not apply to Jammu and Kashmir,” she said bait-ing detractors.
The daughter may not be the ‘sea¬soned’ politician Sayeed, her 79-year- old father, is but she evidently knows her stuff. The rough and tumble of politics, particularly the preceding six years under the Omar Abdullah- led National Conference-Congress government, have clearly taught her the tricks, including what the ‘politi¬cally expedient noises’ sound like and when she must make them.

“It is not about Mufti saab and Modiji, or PDP and BJP. This is about Jammu and Kashmir,” Mufti declared with appropriate vehemence, in the same breath calling for a South Africa-style Truth and Reconciliation Commission to adjudicate on past wrongs—“Fake encounters as well as killings by militants in the name of finding a resolution for Kashmir”.

She speaks of bringing aboard all stakeholders, the Congress and the National Conference included, appar-ently smug in the knowledge that both parties and for that matter the PDP’s own current partner, the BJP, would very likely squirm at the notion of risking any real exposure of India’s engagement with Kashmir.

Mufti says the PDP-BJP alliance is a “partnership” fully cognisant of the deeply divided differences between both parties. That, she believes, is the crucial catapult with the capacity to rescue Kashmir from the deep hole it has been stuck in since Hari Singh acceded to India in 1947.

Much of the new direction, she says, will emerge from a new under-standing of Kashmir prompted by the inherent contradictions between the PDP and the BJP.
“I think these contradictions which are coming out into the open are good. The country is at least getting educated that Kashmir has a separate constitu¬tion and flag,” she says, insisting how¬ever that the “sovereignty of the country is supreme”. And that neither Kashmir nor the PDP wishes to undo that reality.
For the Valley’s over¬whelmingly young popu¬lation, things may finally be looking up if the PDP- BJP •coalition is allo¬wed to thrive. Besides mending hearts and wea¬ning Kashmiris away from their decades-old state of alienation, Mufti is already talking about creating more space for young people: “We want more coffee houses, more libraries, open kind of spaces where young people can go sit and chat,” she says.
Weekends at Jammu’s Wave Mall witness hundreds if not a couple of thousand Valley youngsters happily letting their hair down. If Mufti has her way, all that will change. The Valley will have it all and more.
As she says, “I am a McDonald’s freak. I love it.”